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The CARES Act
Passage of this new bill has implications on many American individuals and businesses

 

In response to the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on the economy and the 2019 tax filing season, government officials have enacted the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This bill, as signed into law by President Donald Trump on March 27, 2020, includes temporary rulings providing tax savings and increased cash flow opportunities for individuals affected.

 

There are several provisions in the bill that may impact your financial and tax planning strategies, including:

  • Extended tax filing deadlines, including an extension for 2019 IRA & HSA contributions
  • Cash payments for individuals
  • Temporary suspension of Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs)
  • Additional charitable and business loss deductions

 

There are also several provisions in the bill that impact small businesses, including:

  • Payroll protection program
  • Refundable credit against payroll taxes for eligible employers

 

Given the widespread impacts of this law, I recommend you review the detailed overview of the law our expert Financial & Estate planning team created, and call me with any questions. We will discuss any potential impacts to your plan and recommended strategies to address them in our next meeting.

 

The CARES Act – A Detailed Overview

Our History

COVID-19

In your investing lifetime, you may only see a situation like the recent novel coronavirus (COVID-19) a few times. This is a circumstance where complete candor is necessary. The truth is that we can’t yet gauge the full economic impact, and by the time we can, the volatility may have passed.

It’s important to remember that, in terms of market declines, the recent drop isn’t unprecedented. In fact, in the last six day-to-day declines of 3% or greater, the market rebounded higher a month later. Past performance is no indication of future returns, and it’s uncertain whether history is a good teacher in this instance.1

Markets Have the Virus

Right now, markets are reacting to the news because the outcome is unknown. In a way, COVID-19 has “infected” markets all around the world. In times of market uncertainty, some traders believe the best approach is to sell. Fear is driving decisions. Nobody would blame you if this uncertainty gave you a bit of anxiety, as well.

You Don’t Buy Snow Tires in a Blizzard

By working together to develop an investment strategy that fits your risk tolerance, time horizon, and goals, we have been preparing to weather turbulence. When a blizzard hits, the people who already own snow tires are usually happier than those venturing out into the cold, hoping they’re still in stock. In the same way, it’s generally best to make decisions during periods of low market volatility. We’re in the middle of the storm right now.

Here to Support You

This may be the time you need a trusted financial professional most. During most volatility, we advise you to “stay the course,” and that generally proves to be the best course of action. In times like this, however, it’s easy to question conventional wisdom.

Remember, I am here to help you and your family during this time. Whatever decisions you make, please allow me to support you through them. Feel free to reach out to me with any questions or concerns.

Our Values

“DIRTY DOZEN” TAX SCAMS TO WATCH FOR

Every year the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) releases its list of tax scams, spotlighting the myriad ways that people try to separate you from your money.¹

The “Dirty Dozen”

Identity Theft

Using your personal information, an identity thief can file a fraudulent tax return and claim a refund. If you’ve been a victim of stolen personal information, you can contact the IRS so the agency can protect your tax account.

Phishing

Be wary of fake emails or websites looking to steal your personal information. If you receive a request for information that appears to be from the IRS, contact the IRS directly to verify the request.

Telephone Scams

Scammers will contact you pretending to be from the IRS. They may say that you are due a large refund or owe money (even threatening arrest or revocation of your driver’s license). If you receive such a call, call the IRS and contact the Federal Trade Commission using their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov.

Inflated Refund Claims

Tax preparers promising inflated returns may ask clients to sign a blank return or charge fees based on a percentage of the refund. Beware of phony storefronts or preparers advertising through word-of-mouth to community groups where trust is high.

Return Preparer Fraud

Dishonest preparers may use tax preparation as an excuse to steal your personal information, so only use a preparer who signs the return and has an IRS Preparer Tax Identification Number.

Hiding Income Offshore

The IRS has strengthened its ability to identify offshore holdings, and the failure to report them will be costly.

Impersonation of Charitable Organizations

Fraudulent charities raise money or obtain private information from individuals looking to help. Donate only to recognized charities, and beware of charities whose names sound similar to the well-known ones.

False Income, Expenses or Exemptions

Falsifying your tax return is a high risk, low reward exercise, especially in this age of Big Data.

Frivolous Arguments

Ignore promoters of frivolous arguments that promise you tax relief. Not only are they expected to fail, but you may be subjected to penalties and possible jail time.

Falsely Padding Deductions or Returns 

Dishonestly reporting deductions to reduce tax bills or inflate refunds may open you up to penalties and prosecution.

Abusive Tax Structures

If someone is proposing to eliminate or substantially reduce your taxes through complex tax structures, walk away—they may be offering nothing more than illegal tax evasion.

Excessive Claims for Business Tax Credits

This happens when taxpayers or their tax preparers improperly claim the research credit or the fuel tax credit, which is generally limited to off-highway uses, such as farming.

  1. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2019 FMG Suite.